I was asked today why i was so obsessed with the issue of FGM ( Female genital mutilation)

To me it isn’t an obsession but a passion. I am passionate about this issue, because as a young african woman i can’t help but imagine what my life would have been today, if my parents had not stoop up when grandmothers, aunties and neighbors judged that i was old enough to be circumcised. I am passionate about this issue because some people in some parts of the world still believe in cutting as a way of controlling and oppressing female sexuality. I am passionate about this issue because millions of girls like me every year, and 6000 girls every day are at risk of suffering from FGM. I am passionate about this issue because this practice is a complete violation of women and girls right. Most importantly I am passionate about this issue because i want to fight for the eradication of this practice forever

As sad as this might sound, electricity is a luxury in many parts of Africa. The lack of electricity and the struggle is real, causing millions of students to not attend school. It’s unfortunate and almost unbelievable  that a country such as guinea so rich in Mineral resources could have such difficulties with its energy supply. This picture touches my heart, not only does it portrays the sad reality that Young Guineans face  everyday, it also put a big emphasis on how dedicated these students are about their education. 

To me, this picture is a Strong reminder that  hard work, determination and persistence are the keys to success. I can’t wait to be able to use all that i have learn to create change in my homeland.

As sad as this might sound, electricity is a luxury in many parts of Africa. The lack of electricity and the struggle is real, causing millions of students to not attend school. It’s unfortunate and almost unbelievable that a country such as guinea so rich in Mineral resources could have such difficulties with its energy supply. This picture touches my heart, not only does it portrays the sad reality that Young Guineans face everyday, it also put a big emphasis on how dedicated these students are about their education.

To me, this picture is a Strong reminder that hard work, determination and persistence are the keys to success. I can’t wait to be able to use all that i have learn to create change in my homeland.

peacecorps

timeintogo:

A group of second-year volunteers have been working on a project to bring indestructible soccer balls to Togo to use for HIV/AIDS and malaria educational projects. This spring, a whole lot of these balls arrived in Togo - and last week, they arrived in Datcha. Each volunteer could request balls to use for sensibilisations in their village, so of course I requested some for my girls’ soccer team. We talked about malaria, from transmission to prevention and treatment - sleep under bed nets! Go the dispensaire and get tested! And then we played.

unicef
unicef:

“In my village there is one girl who is younger than I am who has not been cut because I discussed the issue with her parents. I told them how much the operation had hurt me, how it had traumatized me and made me not trust my own parents. They decided that they did not want this to happen to their daughter.”
Meaza was 10 when she was subjected to female genital mutilation (FGM). She now campaigns to protect other girls from this harmful practice. FGM is declining in Ethiopia and many countries around the world, but still too many girls are at risk. We must do more.
Meaza is inspiration that by speaking up to say NO to this harmful practice, we can change attitudes and change girls’ lives. Add your voice: http://uni.cf/GS14

Warms my heart 👏

unicef:

“In my village there is one girl who is younger than I am who has not been cut because I discussed the issue with her parents. I told them how much the operation had hurt me, how it had traumatized me and made me not trust my own parents. They decided that they did not want this to happen to their daughter.”

Meaza was 10 when she was subjected to female genital mutilation (FGM). She now campaigns to protect other girls from this harmful practice. FGM is declining in Ethiopia and many countries around the world, but still too many girls are at risk. We must do more.

Meaza is inspiration that by speaking up to say NO to this harmful practice, we can change attitudes and change girls’ lives. Add your voice: http://uni.cf/GS14

Warms my heart 👏

unicef
unicef:

During conflict, sexual violence can become the norm and remain ingrained in culture long after the war is over. In post-conflict Liberia, where a 14-year civil war ended in 2003, a staggering 87% of children have experienced some form of sexual violation. 
 
‘Olivia’, 12, says she “stopped being a child and started living in fear,” when she was six. “My uncle would sneak into my room and rape me until I bled. He abused me repeatedly until I could no longer control my bladder and bowels”. 
 
Thankfully, another uncle reported Olivia’s case to the police and brought her to hospital where they performed surgery. “Now I have hope in my life once more,” she says. “I returned to school, and I am loving it. Life is still a challenge for me due to having to carry a urine bag with me and being at constant risk of infections. I hope one day I can be free again to play ball with my friends and my sister.”
 

World leaders must do all they can to end the rape and abuse of children in war at this week’s global summit. #TimeToAct #ENDviolence http://uni.cf/PSVI  

unicef:

During conflict, sexual violence can become the norm and remain ingrained in culture long after the war is over. In post-conflict Liberia, where a 14-year civil war ended in 2003, a staggering 87% of children have experienced some form of sexual violation.

 

‘Olivia’, 12, says she “stopped being a child and started living in fear,” when she was six. “My uncle would sneak into my room and rape me until I bled. He abused me repeatedly until I could no longer control my bladder and bowels”.

 

Thankfully, another uncle reported Olivia’s case to the police and brought her to hospital where they performed surgery. “Now I have hope in my life once more,” she says. “I returned to school, and I am loving it. Life is still a challenge for me due to having to carry a urine bag with me and being at constant risk of infections. I hope one day I can be free again to play ball with my friends and my sister.”

 

World leaders must do all they can to end the rape and abuse of children in war at this week’s global summit. #TimeToAct #ENDviolence http://uni.cf/PSVI