The disease that doesn’t have a cure.

I am going to briefly adress the topic of ebola. By now I am sure that the entire world knows what it is and how fast it is spreading across west Africa. Since March, there have been more than 1,200 cases of Ebola reported in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, in what is considered the largest Ebola outbreak in history.However What i am going to address today is how poorly this epidemic is handled in Africa. What saddens me the most is that this epidemic isn’t even taking seriously by African populations, i mean what other information do you need? This illness isn’t curable.. I am confused? i have heard all kind of stories but the one that chocked me the most is that virus was a conspiracy created by the government. I mean even if it was created to scare the population, why are people taking the risk to expose themselves to a deadly virus .. Shouldn’t they be respecting all the instructions advised by medical corps? Then again, the population isn’t the only side to blame, the government plays a big part in protecting the population. So far they are completely failing at taking preventive measures and at raising awareness about the issue. Furthermore, this topic of ebola is raising other issues that in my opinion contribute in promoting bad health in Africa; the living condition of the population being one of many. in fact the some people’s living arrangement/condition isn’t adequate to fight such an infectious disease; how is one supposed to protect themselves when they don’t even have access essential supplies such to soap and clean water. Not talking about our corrupted health system and the lack of expertise from the medical agents.

All this to say that we need to do better as individuals but we also need to do better as part of the african population. The lack of education is apparent, so i believe that each and everyone of us should take this matter in their own hands and educate their surroundings, their families and their communities. Spread the message, and do your part it could be something as little as an educational panel, a fundraising, or a collect of supply.

parisbostonconakry

stay-human:

I cannot recommend this video enough. This woman breaks it down perfectly.

The Stories That Europe Tells Itself About Its Colonial History

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

“She said once she was shocked that her son while being taught Belgian history, was taught nothing about Congo. She said “They teach my son in school that he must help the poor Africans, but they don’t teach him about what Belgium did in Congo.” Of course, all countries are evasive about the past for which they feel ashamed, but I was shocked by what seemed to me not evasiveness but an erasure of history

If her son doesn’t learn that the modern Congo State began a hundred years ago as the personal property of a Belgian king, who was desperate to get wealthy from ivory and rubber, if her son doesn’t learn that the hands of Congolese people were chopped off for not producing enough resources to meet the king’s greed, if her son doesn’t learn that the Belgian government later led Congo with a deliberate emphasis on not producing an educated class, so that Congolese could become clerks and mechanics but couldn’t go to university, if her son doesn’t learn that more recently, even though it was the Americans who installed the Mobutu dictatorship, Belgium was a major force behind the scenes propping him up, if this young Belgian boy, knows nothing about these incidents, then, at some point, they would perhaps no longer have happened because the past after all is the past because we collectively acknowledged that it is so. 

This young Belgian boy would grow up to see Africa only as a place that requires his aid, his help, his charity with no complications for him. A place that can help him show how compassionate he can be, and most of all, a place whose present has no connection to Europe. 

It is not that Europe has denied its colonial history. Instead, Europe has developed a way of telling the story of its colonial history that ultimately seeks to erase that history”

I was asked today why i was so obsessed with the issue of FGM ( Female genital mutilation)

To me it isn’t an obsession but a passion. I am passionate about this issue, because as a young african woman i can’t help but imagine what my life would have been today, if my parents had not stoop up when grandmothers, aunties and neighbors judged that i was old enough to be circumcised. I am passionate about this issue because some people in some parts of the world still believe in cutting as a way of controlling and oppressing female sexuality. I am passionate about this issue because millions of girls like me every year, and 6000 girls every day are at risk of suffering from FGM. I am passionate about this issue because this practice is a complete violation of women and girls right. Most importantly I am passionate about this issue because i want to fight for the eradication of this practice forever

As sad as this might sound, electricity is a luxury in many parts of Africa. The lack of electricity and the struggle is real, causing millions of students to not attend school. It’s unfortunate and almost unbelievable  that a country such as guinea so rich in Mineral resources could have such difficulties with its energy supply. This picture touches my heart, not only does it portrays the sad reality that Young Guineans face  everyday, it also put a big emphasis on how dedicated these students are about their education. 

To me, this picture is a Strong reminder that  hard work, determination and persistence are the keys to success. I can’t wait to be able to use all that i have learn to create change in my homeland.

As sad as this might sound, electricity is a luxury in many parts of Africa. The lack of electricity and the struggle is real, causing millions of students to not attend school. It’s unfortunate and almost unbelievable that a country such as guinea so rich in Mineral resources could have such difficulties with its energy supply. This picture touches my heart, not only does it portrays the sad reality that Young Guineans face everyday, it also put a big emphasis on how dedicated these students are about their education.

To me, this picture is a Strong reminder that hard work, determination and persistence are the keys to success. I can’t wait to be able to use all that i have learn to create change in my homeland.

peacecorps

timeintogo:

A group of second-year volunteers have been working on a project to bring indestructible soccer balls to Togo to use for HIV/AIDS and malaria educational projects. This spring, a whole lot of these balls arrived in Togo - and last week, they arrived in Datcha. Each volunteer could request balls to use for sensibilisations in their village, so of course I requested some for my girls’ soccer team. We talked about malaria, from transmission to prevention and treatment - sleep under bed nets! Go the dispensaire and get tested! And then we played.

unicef
unicef:

“In my village there is one girl who is younger than I am who has not been cut because I discussed the issue with her parents. I told them how much the operation had hurt me, how it had traumatized me and made me not trust my own parents. They decided that they did not want this to happen to their daughter.”
Meaza was 10 when she was subjected to female genital mutilation (FGM). She now campaigns to protect other girls from this harmful practice. FGM is declining in Ethiopia and many countries around the world, but still too many girls are at risk. We must do more.
Meaza is inspiration that by speaking up to say NO to this harmful practice, we can change attitudes and change girls’ lives. Add your voice: http://uni.cf/GS14

Warms my heart 👏

unicef:

“In my village there is one girl who is younger than I am who has not been cut because I discussed the issue with her parents. I told them how much the operation had hurt me, how it had traumatized me and made me not trust my own parents. They decided that they did not want this to happen to their daughter.”

Meaza was 10 when she was subjected to female genital mutilation (FGM). She now campaigns to protect other girls from this harmful practice. FGM is declining in Ethiopia and many countries around the world, but still too many girls are at risk. We must do more.

Meaza is inspiration that by speaking up to say NO to this harmful practice, we can change attitudes and change girls’ lives. Add your voice: http://uni.cf/GS14

Warms my heart 👏